A Challenge for 2014: Three Steps for Sharing Your Family History

07 Jan 2014

So we are off on a New Year. And, as we discussed last week, I hope you have put together some goals for your genealogical research in 2014. I’ve been working on mine, and BOY will 2014 be a busy one for me!

One of the things I think is very important is sharing your family history. I have heard way too many stories of genealogists whose life work is accumulated in file cabinets, boxes, and bookshelves, only to have it tossed out by family members after the genealogist passes away. This is a true tragedy.

One of the major problems is genealogists who feel they can’t share their research until they are “done.” Let me tell you from my many years of experience that only rarely will you ever be “done.” There will always be a new line, a new question, additional evidence, etc.

The moral of the story is, don’t wait to be “done.” Share as you go. Put together bits and pieces of the family story into smaller stories. As you put more and more of these stories together, you can eventually put together the bigger picture of your family.

 

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Take these three simple steps to start sharing your research with your family so your work won’t be lost.

1. Format

Decide what form you want your sharing to take. The world of the Internet has given us many new options for sharing. Select a family to look at and review the materials you have for that family. Do you have written stories? Original documents? Images of records? Oral interviews? Here are some formats you can utilize:

  • Monograph This is a traditional way of publishing. Write up your family in a traditional genealogical sketch format. You can focus on a single family unit (parents children, and grandchildren), or expand it to include more of the lineage. You can have these printed at your local copy shop relatively inexpensively, and give them to the family.
  • Blog Creating a blog is very simple nowadays. In addition to sharing information about your family, you can write about your research process. Even distant family members will be able to easily follow your research, and it makes it even easier for them to find you and get in touch to share research.
  • Slide Show/Video If you have lots of images, video, and/or oral interviews, you can easily create a slide show or simple video to share. Be certain when putting these materials together that you are not violating anyone’s copyright.

 

2. Schedule

Put your project into your calendar. Scheduling time to work on it on a regular basis will make it easier to accomplish. You won’t have to constantly remember and try to fit it into your schedule once it is filled with other items.

 

3. Review

Periodically review your progress. This is even more important if you have multiple projects going at the same time.  Periodic reviews will also ensure you make headway on each task. You can reevaluate your project and guarantee success.

Follow these steps and you will be surprised how quickly you will make progress. And as you finish one project, you will be able to start on the next one.

For 2014 I would like to give you a challenge. Pick at least one project. One story. And start writing it up and putting it together to share with your family. Try it for at least a few months, and see how much progress you make. Your family will be so grateful to hear the stories of their history!